Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Due to COVID-19 we are currently experiencing a high demand for products, however deliveries are taking up to 5 working days

We’re working hard to reduce the lead times and we will let you know if your order is delayed. Please wait to be updated by email rather than calling our customer services team as we prioritise our most vulnerable patients at this time.

We’re working closely with our suppliers to keep essentials stocked up as frequently as possible. However, to help everyone have access to the essentials they need, we have limited the sale  between 1 to 6 units per item, per customer based on the product selected.

Get the latest information and advice about coronavirus (COVID-19).

Check if you or your child has symptoms

If you have any of the main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), you must stay at home (self-isolate) and get a test.

Main symptoms

The main symptoms of coronavirus are:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you’ve noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

Most people with coronavirus have at least 1 of these symptoms.

What to do if you have symptoms

If you have any of the main symptoms of coronavirus:

    1. Stay at home (self-isolate) – do not leave your home or have visitors. Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, must also self-isolate.
    2. Get a test – get a test to check if you have coronavirus as soon as possible. Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, should also get a test if they have symptoms.

Coronavirus in children

Children can get coronavirus (COVID-19), but they seem to get it less often than adults and it’s usually less serious.

Symptoms of coronavirus in children

The main symptoms of coronavirus are:

  • a high temperature
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot, for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours
  • a loss or change to sense of smell or taste – this means they cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

What to do if your child has symptoms

If your child has any of the main symptoms of coronavirus:

    1. Stay at home (self-isolate) – do not leave your home or have visitors. Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, must also self-isolate.
    2. Get a test – get a test to check if you have coronavirus as soon as possible. Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, should also get a test if they have symptoms.

Self-isolation and treating symptoms

What is self-isolation?

Self-isolation is when you stay at home because you have or might have coronavirus (COVID-19).

This helps stop the virus spreading to other people.

When to self-isolate

Self-isolate if:

  • you have any symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature, a new, continuous cough or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste)
  • you’ve tested positive for coronavirus – this means you have coronavirus
  • you live with someone who has symptoms or has tested positive
  • someone in your support bubble has symptoms or has tested positive

How to self-isolate

You must not leave your home if you’re self-isolating.

Don’t

  • do not go to work, school or public places – work from home if you can

  • do not go on public transport or use taxis

  • do not go out to get food and medicine – order it online or by phone, or ask someone to bring it to your home

  • do not have visitors in your home, including friends and family – except for people providing essential care

  • do not go out to exercise – exercise at home or in your garden, if you have one

How long to self-isolate

If you have symptoms or have tested positive for coronavirus, you’ll usually need to self-isolate for at least 7 days.

You’ll usually need to self-isolate for 14 days if:

  • someone you live with has symptoms or tested positive
  • someone in your support bubble has symptoms or tested positive
  • you’ve been told by NHS Test and Trace that you’ve been in contact with someone who has coronavirus

Get a test if you have symptoms

If you have symptoms, get a test to check if you have coronavirus as soon as possible.

The test needs to be done in the first 5 days of having symptoms.

Or Use NHS 111 online coronavirus service

People At Higher Risk

Who’s at higher risk from coronavirus

Coronavirus (COVID-19) can make anyone seriously ill. But for some people, the risk is higher.

There are 2 levels of higher risk:

  • high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable)
  • moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

Important

The lists below may not include everyone who’s at higher risk from coronavirus and may change.

People at high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable)

People at high risk from coronavirus include people who:

  • have had an organ transplant
  • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy
  • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer
  • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors)
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
  • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine
  • have been told by a doctor they have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD)
  • have a condition that means they have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell)
  • are taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections (such as high doses of steroids or immunosuppressant medicine)
  • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant

If you’re at high risk from coronavirus, you should have received a letter from the NHS.

Speak to your GP or hospital care team if you have not been contacted and think you should have been.

How to protect yourself if you’re at high risk

Do

  • stay at home as much as possible

  • try to stay 2 metres (3 steps) away from anyone you do not live with when outside your home

  • only meet other people outdoors, in groups of up to 6 – try to stay 2 metres away from each other at all times

  • wash your hands as soon as you get home

  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds

  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available

  • get food and medicine delivered and left outside your door – ask friends and family to help or register to get coronavirus support on GOV.UK if you need it

  • prepare a hospital bag, including a list of the medicines you’re taking, in case you need to go into hospital

Don’t

  • do not have visitors inside your home, including friends and family, unless they’re providing essential care
  • do not go into other people’s homes – except to use the toilet or get to their garden

  • do not share or pass things to people you do not live with, including food and drinks

  • do not go into any other indoor places, such as shops

People at moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

People at moderate risk from coronavirus include people who:

  • are 70 or older
  • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)
  • have heart disease (such as heart failure)
  • have diabetes
  • have chronic kidney disease
  • have liver disease (such as hepatitis)
  • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy)
  • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections
  • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids)
  • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above)

What to do if you’re at moderate risk

If you’re at moderate risk from coronavirus, you can go out to work (if you cannot work from home) and for things like getting food or exercising. But you should try to stay at home as much as possible.

It’s very important you follow the general advice on social distancing. This includes trying to stay at least 2 metres (3 steps) away from anyone you do not live with.

Other things that can affect your risk

A report by Public Health England found that other things might also mean you are more likely to get seriously ill from coronavirus.

These include:

  • your age – your risk increases as you get older
  • being a man
  • where in the country you live – the risk is higher in poorer areas
  • being from a Black, Asian or minority ethnic background
  • being born outside of the UK or Ireland
  • living in a care home
  • having certain jobs, such as nurse, taxi driver and security guard

See the full report on disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 on GOV.UK.

Social distancing: what you need to do

How to avoid spreading the infection

It’s very important to do what you can to reduce the risk of you and other people getting ill with coronavirus.

You can spread the virus even if you do not have symptoms.

Do

  • try to stay at least 2 metres (3 steps) away from anyone you do not live with (or anyone not in your support bubble)

  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds

  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available

  • wash your hands as soon as you get home

  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze

  • put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards

Don’t

  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Important Updates

 

St Helier Hospital :COVID19